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A year ago, I left on a trip that encompassed 8 months of travel through Europe and Asia. The last 4 months back home have been an utter hell. I am working, but am miserable every day. When I meet with friends, we might talk about travel-but being that none of them have ever traveled for a long period of time, it seems like they are difficult to relate to. It would be nice if there was a "support group"-i.e. a group of folks who have traveled for a long time and returned to reality-who I could talk to.

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8 Answers

  • +1

    Hi David,

    Unfortunately, I don't think you ever fully recover from long term travel. My best piece of advice is to try and treat your hometown as if you were a traveller there. Keep an eye out for interesting events, try out the newest restaurants/bars, take day or weekend trips outside of the city - and bring your friends along. The other option? Start planning your next trip - no matter how far away it may be. Remember though, you're not alone in feeling this way - all nomads do! almost 2 years ago

  • 0

    Best way is to use you're non travelling time to plan for future travels and do a lot of local trips around your own area. over 1 year ago

    Answered by via Site_iconWorldNomads.com
  • 0

    Long term travel changes you. I believe it is a good change. Embrace it and relive the happy moments you had in your other travels. Life is about learning and travelling is one good way to do that. So don't see it as a problem but more of a lot of opportunities in the future to see other places, because you will plan more travels for sure! over 1 year ago

    Answered by via Site_iconWorldNomads.com
  • 0

    Hi David, I traveled for six months, returned home and, like you, tried to pick up where I left off. I wasn't happy so I am back on the road. (I have retirement income so I don't have to work). Your idea is the one I would have suggested! Find someone or a group of people who shares your passion and your longing. My current travels have been life-changing in a way that no one in my life back home can really understand -- so I reached out to someone who has had a similar experience, both at home and in her travels. We have been able to share our experiences in ways that make them even deeper and richer, and put them in the context of our "other" lives. Writing my blog helps a lot too. Download all those enriching and frustrating moments any time they come to mind. Best wishes and keep traveling. Kim over 1 year ago

    Answered by via Site_iconWorldNomads.com
  • 0

    i spent 8 years living and working and backpacking abroad over a 20 year period between the ages of 18/19 to 38, when i can to Japan with my then Japanese girlfriend, who is now my wife. we spent 5 sort of happy years together in New Zealand, Hong Kong and Holland where i was working (i did spend about 2 1/2 years backpacking through Asia between the ages of 23/24- 26/27, 6 months in India, wow fantastic, 4 month before / after working / travelling in Australia (illegally on a tourist visa) drinking and smoking pot and dancing in Thailand, not to mention meeting holiday girlfriends there. when we came to Japan, my then girlfriend got accidentally pregnant (never wanted kids myself), so now 15 years later i consider that i am still travelling, sort of major travel living in Akita City, Japan. now after the first 13 years of wiping our 2 babies' arses, i can escape to South Korea etc for a few day. in the past i used to stay in $1-2 hotels no problem, but now at 53 i prefer 4 or 5 star hotels. also had the fabled bullshit 'traveller's diseases', hepatitis and dysentery, nearly died in an African hospital and stopped backpacking after the British Mafia introduced themselves to me at the end of the railway line from Delhi in Jaiselmere in India. so all in all i am happy to have settled down in Japan but it is difficult to not feel restless, particularly when you have serious family commitments. good luck. try living long term in a foreign country if you feel brave, don't forget to learn the local language according to your natural language ability and level and respect the local culture. hope this helps, Doug (British and proud of it !!). over 1 year ago

    Answered by via Site_iconWorldNomads.com
  • +1

    I travelled for 12 months, then tried to go back to my old job. It was hard. Getting through the first month was hell. I gave myself 1 year to see if this urge to travel would go away. It didn't. After the year I quit my job and now I am a freelance guide working on ships. I have 6 months of the year for my own travel and 5-6 months when I work and travel. Ideal. Try, but don't try too hard to settle. Katja over 1 year ago

    Answered by Katja Rieddel via Site_iconWorldNomads.com
  • 0

    David I can relate! Actually I have a whole section of my blog related to this topic "Fernweh Promblems." I give tips for how to discover culture in your current city during those times when travel isn't an option. Check it out, gypsyrootstravel.com
    - Megan over 1 year ago

    Answered by Megan Backheuser via Site_iconWorldNomads.com
  • 0

    Hey David, You're experiencing reverse culture shock! I'm a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer and we had training sessions to prepare us for it. It's unavoidable, though, and perfectly normal. You've changed and everything "back home" hasn't. Over time, like a bad cold, the symptoms: depression, frustration, boredom.... will lessen. In the short term seek out other travelers to swap stories with and plot out your next escape! Happy trails. over 1 year ago

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