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When you live and work as a freelancer in a given country you have to pay social security payments (or social insurance). What if you travel indefinitely and are no longer classified as resident anywhere?

7 Answers

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    Technically you have to have a country of origin, because you need to be able to update your passport. Therefore it is not possible to "travel indefinitely" as in order to obtain a passport from your country, you need a residency. Also, while you are gone- the country may do a number of things: such as go to war (causing its borders to shut down), have an epidemic of some sort or discover a new treatment for a disease overseas. So you also need to be able to obtain your flu shots, travel shots and screenings, as well as any other checks the government wishes to be done. Otherwise, the government may believe you are hiding something from them. Basically in all actuality the only way to travel indefinitely, is to run from the government ( like in the Bourne Series). about 4 years ago

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    Well, I have a country of origin, but it seems from your answer that I will always need a country of residence as well, or at least I'll need one every ten years when it comes to renewing my passport.

    But more importantly I'm wondering if I will still have to pay social security contributions and tax if I have passive income and do not officially reside anywhere. Do you know anything about that?

    Cheers. about 4 years ago

    Answered by via Site_iconWorldNomads.com
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    It probably depends on the country you're from Robert. As a Canadian, if I want to avoid paying taxes to Canada on the income I am receiving while living abroad I must claim non-residency. I can still keep my passport and be entitled to the Canadian pension I have already paid for, but I forfeit all my other rights as a Canadian. I must close my bank account, cancel my credit cards, and will no longer be entitled to free health care. There is a very strong chance your country of origin believes you owe them income tax if you have not made a formal declaration of non-residency.

    Then there are the tax issues of the country you are in. I paid taxes in Australia & the UK, but was entitled to claim a percentage back from the Australian government when I left (not in the UK because I was there as a citizen). There are also tax treaties between certain countries. By paying taxes in the UK I do not have to pay them again to Canada.

    You can do some research on your own to get better details (all the info on the Canadian Gov was on their website), but I would strongly suggest you speak to an accountant in your country of origin to get an expert opinion. about 4 years ago

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    I'm from the UK. Whether or not you are declared as resident for tax purposes or not depends on how much time you spend in the country per year. Less than 90 days, not eligible, more than 90 days, eligible. This is why rock stars like Mick Jagger are very careful not to spend too much time in the country.

    Of course, I am also a citizen of the EU, which means I am entitled to live and work anywhere in the EU, pay my taxes and social security contributions in that country and then be entitled to health care, unemployment benefit, disability benefit etc etc and finally an old-age pension in whichever EU country I live in. At least while ever the UK remains a member.

    All this I already know, but my question is more on the lines of: is there a loophole that can be exploited for those of us who voluntarily choose to live outside this system? People who earn their money basically in cyberspace, online, who can work anywhere (remote working) or who don't even have to work because the money just comes in passively and we do not officially reside anywhere. We just travel the world indefinitely getting tourist visas where and when necessary. And pay for our own, private insurance. about 4 years ago

    Answered by via Site_iconWorldNomads.com
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    My advice still stands. Speak to a professional accountant, as you are seeking professional financial advice. about 4 years ago

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    And there is always the question of "how do i keep my drivers license?" about 4 years ago

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    Well, that's not going to be an issue for many years. A UK license is valid for 50 years. I passed in '89 at aged 20, so I won't have to renew it until 2039 when I'm 70 :-) about 4 years ago

    Answered by via Site_iconWorldNomads.com

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