Jarrod Brown

Jarrod Brown

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  • +5 rating

    Where can I find Buddhist temples in Malaysia?

    You'll be able to find them everywhere, but there are a few I'd highlight. The Kek Lok Si Temple in Penang is one of the best in the country. You can get a taxi from Georgetown for less than 40RM or you can take a bus that will bring you to the bottom of the hill. There is also a lot of temples to be seen on the Heritage Trail, a walking trail through Georgetown. It is interesting--there is a Kuan Yin temple and then the Hainan Temple, which is quite famous. Both of these are smaller temples. In Kuala Lumpur, the Thean Hou Temple is notable in Taman Persiaran Desa. There is also the Buddhist Maha Vihara in Bricksfield. In Malacca, the Cheng Hoon Teng temple is also worth checking out. It is not as large as the Kek Kok Si Temple. The cave temples in Ipoh are also something really interesting to see. You can take a bus from the central bus station or a private car. There are several of them, one of which has a botanical garden on the other side of a hill that a cave goes through. Going up the rickety wooden stairs in some of them can be a bit spooky as well as the old scaffolding. These are some of the most impressive temples in Malaysia--and incidentally, Ipoh has some of the best Hindu temples as well if you want to see some excellent examples of Dravidian architecture without going to India or Sri Lanka. over 8 years ago

  • +3 rating

    Is Vietnam safe for a solo female traveller?

    Vietnam is safe as long as you take normal precautions, although don't wear flashy jewelry, and be aware of bag snatchers and pick pockets who are very active. I had dinner last night with a man who literally had his necklace cut off his neck in HCMC without him being aware until afterward. My wife got her gold necklace yanked off of her neck last year while we were waiting in traffic about a year ago. My pocket was picked about four months later. over 8 years ago

  • +2 rating

    Where can I see tea plantations near Kuala Lumur?

    Michael is right--the Cameron Highlands are the closest place, and they are too far for a day trip. You can easily book a bus there--it is a very winding road, so if you get motion sickness, pack some dramamine or take ginger pills. I suggest you go past Ringlet and stay at Tanah Rata--it can be a charming break from KL. over 8 years ago

  • +2 rating

    What is the most scenic route to take from Bangkok to Siem Reap?

    You can take the bus all the way from Bangkok to Siem Reap. There is just one way to go--through Poipet / Aranyaprathet crossing and then on National Road 6 to Siem Reap. It is a very, very long trip. A few things to remember--most buses will drop you in Aranyaprathet and then you will need to take a tuk-tuk the border. You'll be met by Cambodian officials who will try to overcharge you for your visa while still on the Thai side. Someone will walk you across the border, and then you will be told you need to change money (you don't--US$ is accepted everywhere, and baht most places--but the exchange rate is 4000 Riel to the dollar--they will give you 1/2 that at the border) and then you will also be told you have to take an overpriced government private car or bus the rest of the way. Also, the border often closes at 5PM. So, keep your wits about you and be ready to be uncomfortable, to refuse to overpay officials, and to look around for your own transport. If you are really up for an adventure, I suggest you stop in Sisaphon and go see Bantaey Chmar, but be forewarned there are no tourists there and even finding someone who speaks English or can take you there (on the back of a motorcycle for a couple hours on a dirt road) can be a challenge, but it will let you break up the trip. There isn't much to see in Poipet except casinos. over 8 years ago

  • +2 rating

    Is it necessary to get Rabies injections before going to Indonesia including Bali?

    Hi, Hilary. You do not have to have a rabies vaccination unless you are really planning on getting off the beaten path. The outbreak of rabies has been confined to Bali, and elsewhere it is probably about as common as it is at home. Mostly, just steer clear of dogs, cats, monkeys, and other mammals besides people. If you intend to do a lot of biking or hiking, you might want to consider it. Also, be aware there has been an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease in Bali that has affected some travelers in the Kuta area, so in case you start coming down with a cold you in that area you should immediately see a doctor. The origin hasn't been traced, and there are many ways to contract this very serious form of pneumonia. There is currently a sizable cholera outbreak in Papau New Guinea. And depending on how long your stay in Indonesia is and what activities you will engage in, you may want to rethink your inoculations. Otherwise, I would not consider it essential. Personally, I would also not bother with malaria prophylactics unless you are going into areas with known outbreaks, and the same with Japanese encephalitis. In terms of malaria medication, you can get this at international hospitals in Bali like BIMC in Kuta or Jakarta. Being smart about mosquitoes will help protect you here as well as from other serious illnesses like dengue fever for which there are no vaccines or prophylactics. Hep A I would recommend to anyone traveling in Southeast Asia who doesn't already have it. Hep B is also one I highly suggest but it has to be administered in three rounds over a six-month process. And if you are going to be staying long, in rural areas, smaller towns, with local families or will be in situations where you may be unsure about the water quality, you will want typhoid as well. Of course, it is always better to be safe that sorry . . . http://www.southeastasiatraveladvice.com/2010/12/what-vaccines-do-i-need-for-southeast.html about 8 years ago

  • +1 rating

    Should one wait to travel until you have some sort of degree?

    I first traveled as an undergraduate student. What was a month-long trip to Malaysia ended up with me returning three months later for a year to do research, and then working and traveling in Malaysia for another year. I've lived in South and Southeast Asia now for half of the last decade. I would say that if you plan on working abroad, then you should have a degree. Otherwise, I am not sure it matters unless you are looking for some perspective loaned by your studies. And if you are not traveling to work or study, then savings is the name of the game. Work out a budget, set savings goals, and realize that it is going to be worth it. Where you thinking about going, ZachAttack? over 8 years ago

  • +1 rating

    Is there left luggage at Kuala Lumpur airport?

    It cost about 30-35RM for overnight for a large bag. It is in the arrival terminal. As you come out, it is in the back-left corner. over 8 years ago

  • +1 rating

    Where can I find the best traditional laksa in KL?

    Try the new food court in Lot 10. They have gone a long way to ensure all "hawkers" are cooking traditional foods the traditional way. Whether it will be to your taste or not . . . well, as Adnin said, there are a lot of different laksas. You can find directions and information here: http://www.lot10.com.my/ The Chow Kit Market is another place to find some delicious laksa. This huge market is a site to see in itself if you have not yet been there. It is located at the end of Jalan Tuanku Abdul Rahman, but everyone in KL knows where it is. It is best to go in the morning or early afternoon as it begins to clear out later in the day. But (I am sure this is a matter of debate) the best laksa in Malaysia is to be found at the hawker stand in Balik Pulau on the "far side" of Pulau Penang. This tiny township is famous for its Laksa Janggus and Assam Laksa. It is a great stop off in case you are circling the island, which I also highly recommend. over 8 years ago