Jarrod Brown

Jarrod Brown

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  • +1 rating

    what needles are recommended for both Vietnam and India

    It depends on your locations and itinerary. If you are staying in urban areas, you will likely be fine without any, but typhoid and hepatitis A are standard. You are more likely to get diarrhea or constipated than anything serious. Business travelers to India and Vietnam I work with rarely if ever take the time for immunizations outside the standard immunizations they already have--measles/mumps/rubella (MMR) vaccine, diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT) vaccine or tetanus alone and the pliovirus vaccine. Hep A can be gotten through exposure through food or water. Cases of travel-related hepatitis A can also occur in travelers to developing countries with "standard" tourist itineraries, accommodations, and food consumption behaviors. I suggest all Southeast Asian travelers are vaccinated for Hep A. For longer term travel, rural travel, work that might expose you to body fluids, or intensive time with locals like a possible amorous encounter, Hepatitis B is also recommended. Japanese encephalitis is also something you might want to consider for long stays in rural areas in Vietnam. Malaria is only a risk in certain areas. The link I've provided below also has a link to the CDC Malaria Map that can help you determine if you are traveling in an at-risk area. Malaria in certain places has specific drug resistance--so it is possible if you are trekking in Assam you will need a different malaria medication that you will require for boating on the Upper Mekong. The packing list below also has a lot of other more mundane health items you might want to consider . . . like fiber tablets. http://www.southeastasiatraveladvice.com/2011/01/southeast-asia-packing-list.html almost 8 years ago

  • 0 rating

    What can I see in half a day in Chicago?

    With that amount of time, it would be hard to take in a museum. A walk in Millennium Park is nice--there is some great public art, and you can also stroll around the downtown area some as well. Chinatown is also a great place--whenever I am in Chicago, I take the train to Chinatown and have dim sum for breakfast and a quick walk around. That would make a nice morning outing. almost 9 years ago

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    Fly into Vietnam and leave from Bangkok, what's better, Ho Chi Min or Hanoi? Suggested routes?

    That will be a difficult itinerary. I answered this before, and it failed to load correctly, so here is my quick suggestions. The first one would be a lot more leisurely but doesn't include Laos. The second one does but would eat up at least 3-5 whole days on buses, and there would not always be night buses connecting destinations. Just message me if you'd like more details. HCMC: 4 nights Chao Duc/Long Bihn: 3 Nights Phnom Penh: 3 Nights Siem Reap: 5-6 nights Sisaphon/Bantaey Chmar: 2 nights (info on this here--it is a bit off the beaten path but not really out of the way) http://www.southeastasiatraveladvice.com/2010/11/banteay-chmar-travelers-tale.html Battambang: 2 nights Arayanaprathet: 1 Night Bangkok OR Hanoi: 3 Nights Luang Prabang: 4 Nights Vientaine: 4 nights Pakse: 4 Nights Kratie: 2 Night Phnom Penh: 1 night Siem Reap: 3 days Bangkok If you have it in your budget, you could fly from Vientiane to Phnom Pehn and spent more time there and in Siem Reap. Vientiane to Pakse is a very, very long trip, and it is basically another two days on the road traveling to get from Pakse to Siem Reap. If you are coming in the rainy season . . . like now until about mid-September or so . . . it will probably take even longer. Hanoi is a long way from Bangkok almost 9 years ago

  • +2 rating

    Is it necessary to get Rabies injections before going to Indonesia including Bali?

    Hi, Hilary. You do not have to have a rabies vaccination unless you are really planning on getting off the beaten path. The outbreak of rabies has been confined to Bali, and elsewhere it is probably about as common as it is at home. Mostly, just steer clear of dogs, cats, monkeys, and other mammals besides people. If you intend to do a lot of biking or hiking, you might want to consider it. Also, be aware there has been an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease in Bali that has affected some travelers in the Kuta area, so in case you start coming down with a cold you in that area you should immediately see a doctor. The origin hasn't been traced, and there are many ways to contract this very serious form of pneumonia. There is currently a sizable cholera outbreak in Papau New Guinea. And depending on how long your stay in Indonesia is and what activities you will engage in, you may want to rethink your inoculations. Otherwise, I would not consider it essential. Personally, I would also not bother with malaria prophylactics unless you are going into areas with known outbreaks, and the same with Japanese encephalitis. In terms of malaria medication, you can get this at international hospitals in Bali like BIMC in Kuta or Jakarta. Being smart about mosquitoes will help protect you here as well as from other serious illnesses like dengue fever for which there are no vaccines or prophylactics. Hep A I would recommend to anyone traveling in Southeast Asia who doesn't already have it. Hep B is also one I highly suggest but it has to be administered in three rounds over a six-month process. And if you are going to be staying long, in rural areas, smaller towns, with local families or will be in situations where you may be unsure about the water quality, you will want typhoid as well. Of course, it is always better to be safe that sorry . . . http://www.southeastasiatraveladvice.com/2010/12/what-vaccines-do-i-need-for-southeast.html almost 9 years ago

  • 0 rating

    Has anyone had to pay taxes on the gifts they bought from Cambodia when going through customs??

    Hi, Lauren, Generally, USA travelers are permitted up to $400 in duty-free goods. When you fill out your customs declaration, if you declare less than $400 in goods and go through the "Nothing To Declare" customs line, you should have no problem. When you complete your embarkation and customs declaration it will state how much you can bring in duty free in case it has changed in the last six months since I was last back in the USA. about 8 years ago

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    I am flying to KL for about ten days in september. Can anyone recommend a quality dive resort in Malaysia or nearby. I have been to Sipadan

    There is no comparable diving on the Peninsula, and you are arriving at the worst possible time for diving--in the middle of the monsoon season. Hate to be a downer but the rainy season is from late August/early September until mid November, during which time on average, there are about two hours of rain per day. Visibility is reduced, and a lot of operators simply shut down. The Perhentian Islands will be mostly abandoned due to the monsoon season, so I do not recommend even bothering. You could jet over to Pulau Tioman if cost isn't a factor, but again it is a really horrible time to be diving in the South China Sea, but at least the resorts stay open. All the operators there are comparable. I'd say Pulau Payar (can get there from Langkawi) is the next best place to dive close to KL, and with some luck you might just have a day that there is no rain and the boats go out. Oh, and across the board they just do two dives a day, not the three most of us are used to. If you have time you might consider the Andaman side of Southern Thailand which generally has a bit better diving (but the same weather). about 8 years ago

  • 0 rating

    Mosquitoes in Singapore?

    http://www.southeastasiatraveladvice.com/2011/01/southeast-asia-packing-list.html This Southeast Asia Packing list has some suggestions on how to pack to avoid mosquitoes. They are there in Singapore, but are not a huge issue. You should be okay if you take a few precautions like dressing appropriately. about 8 years ago

  • 0 rating

    Can anyone possibly recommend a good gym in Siem Reap?

    Well, I found a few by fluke today. There is another gym further down High School Road past the Wat Bo area. It is local, and well equipped with free weights. I'll get a price for it tomorrow and add a comment. Also, the Paradise Angkor Villa Hotel. I actually saw an advertisement for its health club including pool for $36/month, but I am not sure what the facilities are like--it is the Bayon Spa & Health Club. Turns out there is another Bayon Spa & Health Clubat the Somadevi Angkor Hotel & Spa but the photos make it look like a treadmill, exercise bike and weight machine. about 8 years ago