Jaidev S

Jaidev S

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  • +2 rating

    Is USD $100/day unreasonable for backpacking in Japan?

    It depends on what you are trying to do, but I managed on about that comfortably. If you have sorted out things like a rail pass and such before hand then should be fine. Backpackers I stayed in were like $30 US for a bed in a dorm room, and generally I was paying < $10 a meal. More interesting food can often cost more of course. Most of the things I went to see didn't cost much to get into, biggest costs that aside really were transport. about 9 years ago

  • +2 rating

    Japan - suggested itinerary and can I do it on my own?

    Itinerary wise, I think you might be trying to get too much done in too little time - spending a bit more time at certain destinations like Simon suggested is probably a good idea. While traveling around I found that the Japanese really do want to help you, but the english literacy there is very very low. Along with some basic japanese, it is very useful to learn Katakana (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katakana). Katakana is what is used when words have been adopted from english. It might look daunting at first but there are only 50ish characters you need to know, and they translate easily into english syllables. The reason katakana is useful is that a lot of signs you will encounter are just plain english words written in katakana, for example: Toilet in english becomes 'toire', or トイレ. Breaking the word up into its syllables ト = to, イ = i, レ = re. Basically this means in a lot of cases you can just read the katakana on a lot of signs to get an idea what it says, another example is: bus = basu = バス By the way, I am not saying that all japanese signs have an english version of the words in katakana on them, simply that the japanese use a lot of english words for a lot of basic things. As for "lonely and difficult", while I was there I stayed at some really awesome hostels (mostly, k's houses http://kshouse.jp), and met some really awesome people whom I traveled around with - Hostels might not be for you, but it helps to stay somewhere where they can help you out with working out how to get around / catch trains or anything else like that. If you are only there for 10-12 days, a lot of the stuff you will do will be more on the beaten track, and thus a bit more non-english-speaking traveller friendly. Japan has plenty of amazing things that are commonly traveled (the Japanese *love* to travel around Japan and see everything there is to see). One final tip is to look up english versions of the subway / train maps before you go and print them out. My english Tokyo subway map was a great help! over 9 years ago

  • +2 rating

    What are THE things to see in Perth?

    For Perth, the city itself really isn't *that* amazing, maybe you should spend a day poking around just to say you have been there but that is about it. Must dos are catching the train down to Freemantle (if you can between thursday - sunday as the markets are open then and things in general are a little busier) - There is plenty to do and see there, lots of interesting shops, some good nightlife, and perhaps most importantly the Little Creatures brewery :). I also think visiting Perth without spending a day at one of its beaches is a crime, so check them out - one of my favouites is Cottesloe, and it is easy to get to as well (on the same train line as Freemantle, about 20 mins out of Perth). Rottnest is actually pretty nice, and fits in well with a lot of Perth's attractions (being more about relaxing and having fun than anything else). There is an awesome sunset from there, and the island really is beautiful - a good way to see it is just to cycle around it. One of the bad things about WA is that everything is so spaced out, so if you actually do want to get out of Perth on a 5 day schedule you are kind of out of luck, although if you can find the time I recommend heading south to Margaret River (3ish hours drive south) - a very relaxing place full of good wineries :). over 10 years ago

  • +2 rating

    Any recommendations for good nightclubs (on a Saturday night)?

    I am not a huge house fan, but a couple of electro clubs there: Roxanne Parlour (http://www.roxanneparlour.com.au/events/) Eurotrash (http://www.myspace.com/eurotrashbar) Wow at Inflation (inflation is the club, wow is the night) These are all pretty damn electro with a younger crowd (mostly under 25), playing the kind of stuff you would hear from the bag raiders, van she tech, cut copy dj's, so on. I found Roxanne and Eurotrash pretty cool and friendly, but Inflation is really a pretty crappy club (staff / bouncers are just downright horrible to patrons) but it does get some good acts playing there. All these clubs are in town, with Roxanne and Eurotrash close to one another in china town which is rad. Inflation unsurprisingly is in a more dodgy part of town but still easily accessible. Also check out what is going on at the Prince Bandroom in St Kilda - there are sometimes some awesome electro acts there and tram access to there is pretty good! If you meant more generic electro / house then I can't really help you :) almost 10 years ago

  • +2 rating

    I fly into osaka in June for 11 days & wondering what to do & see? Want to go to Kyoto. Am on budget & want to make most of time :)Pls help

    Heya A few past questions that are similar to yours with good answers are: http://travellr.com/questions/japan/1500/im-planning-my-first-trip-to-japan-any-suggestions-on-how-to-spend-my-12-days and http://travellr.com/questions/japan/1336/japan--suggested-itinerary-and-can-i-do-it-on-my-own Personally, I spent 5 days in Kyoto and I didn't feel that was enough! If you are on a budget you might want to check out k's house (http://kshouse.jp/index_e.html) - I stayed there and it was awesome, easily better than some hotels I ended up in on my budget trip - book early though. Nara and Himeji are both just a day trip away from Kyoto which is pretty convenient. I would also suggest heading to either Osaka or Tokyo (or both) - neither are that far by train / overnight bus, and both have lots to do - not jumping cities *too* much will also help you save a bit of cash. Hope this helps! (btw: http://travellr.com/questions/japan/1006/what-are-some-affordable-read-cheap-accommodations-inaround-tokyo lists some cheap accommodation options in Tokyo) over 9 years ago

  • +2 rating

    Can I use a camera in public in Thailand?

    It depends what you mean by use a camera... While in general photography is fine, its not really polite to photograph specific locals without asking them... Keep in mind too that when you do ask them in a lot of the more touristy places they may say "Sure, but for a dollar"! over 10 years ago

  • +1 rating

    Safety in Thailand... Also have you got some tips for me to meet people while I'm away?

    Just from my experiences in Thailand, and around the region: If you are going to be travelling in a group then I assume you are backpacking, if that is the case then the place you are going to meet fellow travellers the easiest is at hostels / guest houses. The main district for guest houses in Bangkok is on and around Khao San Road (http://wikitravel.org/en/Bangkok/Khao_San_Road). There you will probably see a higher concentration of backpackers than anywhere else in Thailand. Whether you stay there, or at a guest house elsewhere, you will meet people, and you will find people who want to see and do similar things that you want to. This is pretty much the case with wherever you go actually. I found that I just floated from friend to friend over my time in SE Asia, a few days travelling here with this person, a few days exploring this city with the next... The great thing is spending a few days travelling around with someone and you really get to know them quick, its pretty awesome for meeting cool people :). As for safety, I am no expert, but basically it's a case of common sense. There are plenty of guides online on travel safety, and once again your fellow travellers will be a great sources of how dodgy various places are. over 10 years ago

  • +1 rating

    Can someone recommend a really good eco experience in Thailand?

    Check out the Tiger Temple in Kanchanaburi which a couple hours coach west of Bangkok (the temples real name is Wat Pa Luangta Bua Yannasampanno but don't go trying to pronounce that...). Basically the temple contains abandoned / orphaned tigers which have been brought up by the monks. The tigers are adjusted to human company and you get to walk among them / touch / get photos with them in the nearby canyon. There is a "donation" you have to pay when visiting the tigers (about $8 USD) but keep in mind that all this goes to the care of these tigers and helps support the continued rescuing of more. While in the area, check out Erowin National Park - take the walk up past the 7 waterfalls and make sure to have a swim in whichever pools look the nicest (as long as you don't mind having your feet nibbled on by the fish on the way out), and stand under a few of the waterfalls - it's invigorating :). over 10 years ago