Jaidev S

Jaidev S

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  • +2 rating

    I fly into osaka in June for 11 days & wondering what to do & see? Want to go to Kyoto. Am on budget & want to make most of time :)Pls help

    Heya A few past questions that are similar to yours with good answers are: http://travellr.com/questions/japan/1500/im-planning-my-first-trip-to-japan-any-suggestions-on-how-to-spend-my-12-days and http://travellr.com/questions/japan/1336/japan--suggested-itinerary-and-can-i-do-it-on-my-own Personally, I spent 5 days in Kyoto and I didn't feel that was enough! If you are on a budget you might want to check out k's house (http://kshouse.jp/index_e.html) - I stayed there and it was awesome, easily better than some hotels I ended up in on my budget trip - book early though. Nara and Himeji are both just a day trip away from Kyoto which is pretty convenient. I would also suggest heading to either Osaka or Tokyo (or both) - neither are that far by train / overnight bus, and both have lots to do - not jumping cities *too* much will also help you save a bit of cash. Hope this helps! (btw: http://travellr.com/questions/japan/1006/what-are-some-affordable-read-cheap-accommodations-inaround-tokyo lists some cheap accommodation options in Tokyo) over 9 years ago

  • 0 rating

    Are there any recently opened restaurants in Hobart that are worth checking out?

    Btw, should have mentioned: would prefer a more relaxed atmosphere as will be headed there with a group of friends. over 9 years ago

  • +1 rating

    Is it worth going to Melbourne aquarium?

    Melbourne aquarium is a great aquarium (I much preferred it to Sydney's - I didn't constantly feel like they were trying to squeeze all the money they could out of me). The antarctic section is great (penguins!), and the place is really well laid out. The aquarium is in town, and the easiest way to get there would be to train to Flinders Street Station, and then tram south to King Street. Alternately you could train to Southern Cross Station, then walk two blocks south along Spencer St and then one block east along Flinders St http://maps.google.com.au/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=melbourne+aquarium&sll=-26.902477,135.703125&sspn=55.614149,86.923828&ie=UTF8&hq=Melbourne+Aquarium&hnear=Melbourne+Aquarium&z=15&iwloc=A Entry fee was $32 from memory - it was definitely worth it. over 9 years ago

  • 0 rating

    what is the cheapest way to get to Melbourne CBD from the airport ?

    For three people I would catch a cab - if you have return skybus tickets it is $39 each way. The cab to town is about $50 and a lot more convenient. over 9 years ago

  • +1 rating

    Where is the best place to see the Madi Gras?

    This year I watched it from Taylor square. I didn't get there until 5:30ish so I wasn't on the barrier, but the people I was with had brought milk crates so we were able to stand on those and get perfect views. A very useful tip for next year! over 9 years ago

  • +1 rating

    Where is good for yum cha?

    I ended up going to Shark Fin Inn - it was great! I went sunday lunch and it was quite busy - people lining up outside so I am happy I booked ahead (although wait would only have been 20 mins I think). The food was really great, and it ended up being just under $50 total for myself and two friends - crazy good value :) over 9 years ago

  • +2 rating

    Japan - suggested itinerary and can I do it on my own?

    Itinerary wise, I think you might be trying to get too much done in too little time - spending a bit more time at certain destinations like Simon suggested is probably a good idea. While traveling around I found that the Japanese really do want to help you, but the english literacy there is very very low. Along with some basic japanese, it is very useful to learn Katakana (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katakana). Katakana is what is used when words have been adopted from english. It might look daunting at first but there are only 50ish characters you need to know, and they translate easily into english syllables. The reason katakana is useful is that a lot of signs you will encounter are just plain english words written in katakana, for example: Toilet in english becomes 'toire', or トイレ. Breaking the word up into its syllables ト = to, イ = i, レ = re. Basically this means in a lot of cases you can just read the katakana on a lot of signs to get an idea what it says, another example is: bus = basu = バス By the way, I am not saying that all japanese signs have an english version of the words in katakana on them, simply that the japanese use a lot of english words for a lot of basic things. As for "lonely and difficult", while I was there I stayed at some really awesome hostels (mostly, k's houses http://kshouse.jp), and met some really awesome people whom I traveled around with - Hostels might not be for you, but it helps to stay somewhere where they can help you out with working out how to get around / catch trains or anything else like that. If you are only there for 10-12 days, a lot of the stuff you will do will be more on the beaten track, and thus a bit more non-english-speaking traveller friendly. Japan has plenty of amazing things that are commonly traveled (the Japanese *love* to travel around Japan and see everything there is to see). One final tip is to look up english versions of the subway / train maps before you go and print them out. My english Tokyo subway map was a great help! over 9 years ago

  • 0 rating

    Love hotels in Kyoto?

    Ah wow, thanks :) over 9 years ago