Ask Phil

Ask Phil

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  • +1 rating

    What is the address of the best international hospital in Bali Please?

    Suzie, here's the advice from the Australian consulate in Bali. http://www.bali.indonesia.embassy.gov.au/blli/medical.html It lists all the hospitals, but doesn't pass judgement - well, not directly. There are two points made by the consulate which you should consider: They say public hospital doctors also have private practices or lecture at university and can be difficult to contact. Later the consulate says that in the event of an emergency "it is essential that your insurance company doctor can contact the treating doctor". Given that they've already warned that public hospital doctors are difficult to contact, it might be best to go to the private hospital. The best of the private hospitals appears to be BIMC - Bali International Medical Centre BIMC Hospital Bali Jl Bypass Ngurah Rai No. 100X Kuta 80361, Bali, Indonesia Tel: 62-361-761263 Fax: 62-361-764345 Email: info@bimcbali.com Web: www.bimcbali.com Open 24 Hours over 10 years ago

  • +2 rating

    How serious is the dengue fever outbreak in Bali?

    The Bali Times newspaper reported on June 23rd, local health authorities are calling this the worst dengue season in years. 3 Indonesian children died in Denpasar in June. The Western Australian health department has issued a warning because of the high number of Australians returning home with Dengue fever, 151 so far this year compared to just 16 for all of 2006! (Perth Now report; http://bit.ly/a2sR7J). Dengue peaks in the rainy season (lots of water on the ground), but we're into the dry season now which means fewer mosquitoes... but they'll still be around. Dengue seems to be bad everywhere this year. Authorities in Phuket, Thailand, report 400 cases so far this year compared to 160 for the whole of 2009. On a regional basis, Indonesia has more cases of Dengue fever than any other SE Asian country. World health specialists say Dengue Fever is an "emerging disease". From being virtually unknown in the 1950's it is now widespread and infects more people than Malaria. There's no cure (although most people make a full recovery) and no vaccine BUT you can take precautions to minimise your risk. World Nomads (I work there) has a great piece on Dengue and how to avoid it here; http://journals.worldnomads.com/safetyhub/post/52684.aspx The quick tips; wear long sleeves and trousers, preferably white and loose fitting. Cover exposed skin with repellent, and use mosquito coils in rooms. The mosquito responsible for spreading dengue is active during the day (unlike the Malaria mosquito which is a dawn and dusk creature)and lurks in shaded, indoor areas. Dengue fever isn't spread from human to human. it's infected human-to mosquito- to human, so stay away from places where an outbreak is known. How bad is Dengue fever in Bali? It's worse than it's been in years, but if you're careful you can reduce your risk of getting it. No authority, Indonesian or Australian, is advising people to put off travel to Bali. Just use common sense and take precautions. Don't forget to get travel insurance to cover medical expenses. This traveller is certainly glad they did http://journals.worldnomads.com/true-claims-stories/post/18705.aspx over 10 years ago

  • 0 rating

    What should we do in Cape Town

    I agree with MJW, a stack of great things to do in Cape Town. I wrote about my day trip to The Cape (where Atlantic and Indian oceans meet) and posted it on my World Nomads blog, have a look here if you like. http://journals.worldnomads.com/philsylvester/story/58688/South-Africa/Cape-Town-to-The-Cape I talks about some of the great locations to visit on the way down to the cape. over 10 years ago

  • 0 rating

    Are there any parts of Bangkok which are to be avoided?

    thanks, but was looking for something more specific. And I don't mean go-go bars serving shockingly expensive beers. Any recent visitors got tales to tell? Did you walk down any sois which made you feel uneasy? Did locals tell you 'don't go there" because of criminal elements etc. What about women's safety? over 10 years ago

  • +1 rating

    Any updates on travel in Ecuador since the activity of Tungurahua Volcano?

    Hi Martine, I think Banos will have to be off your travel plans, its one of the towns under threat from the volcano. 2500 poeple evacuated, and voluntary evacuations are in place. The ministry of transport has moved in bulldozers, trucks and temporary bridges (bailey bridges) to make sure evacuation routes stay open in the event of worsening situation. Best to stay away I figure. if you speak Spanish then the online newspaper www.elcomercio.com is great for news. The newspaper is quoting a senior official in the Risk Management agency who says; the José Joaquín de Olmedo International Airport serving Guayaquil, has NOT been closed - that was just a rumour - it's operating as normal. Here's the website for the airport with a departure board, presently showing most flights are (en horario) on time. http://www.tagsa.aero/default.htm?nocache=1275526516506 The airport information line is (593) 4 216 9000 but you'll need a fluent Spanish speaker. Phil (world nomads) over 10 years ago

  • 0 rating

    Can I take bottled water into fiji that I purchased in a supermarket in Australia?

    probably, but not in your carry-on luggage. the rules limiting liquids onboard planes still apply. (Saw a man heading home to Australia bin a bottle of Moet at Nadi airport because it was in his hand luggage!) I was there in March and seem to remember taking in a bottle of water, but just one. I wouldn't try to take it in bulk. The excellent Fiji Water comes from... well, you guessed it... and it's available everywhere in Fiji. over 10 years ago

  • 0 rating

    What is the best way to move from one city to another is South Africa?

    SthAf highways are good but the locals have no respect for speed limits! It's a very long drive from Jo'burg to Cape Town, so don't try to do it all in one hit - fatigue will get you! Watch out for the animals which wander onto the roads, especially at dusk and sunrise (some of them can be quite big!). Many South Africans (who cannot afford a car) also walk on the roadsides... try not to hit anyone. A ggod way to see the country (I did the garden Route; from Cape Town to Pt Elizabeth, 800 km with a couple of nights in Pletenberg Bay) but time consuming. over 10 years ago